Following the removal of levels, schools across the country have been getting to grips with how to measure pupil progress in a way which works best for them (rather than simply re-creating a system of levels).

Simon Cowley, a teacher from The White Horse Federation, has written a blog describing their approach which focuses on knowing the child, rather than on collecting statistical data that is not relevant to improving pupil outcomes. He refers to their approach as using the “intelligence toolkit”, which we’ve summarised below.

The “intelligence toolkit” is about:

  • observing and understandinglearning behaviours of a learner – how do they engage with learning and how can teachers best enable this
  • understanding whatwork scrutiny is telling you with regard to pace, precision, thought and the developmental processes over time
  • statistical data, the benchmarking against national norms which tell you if a child is working within age related expectations
  • understanding theemotional intelligence of the learner, the personal attributes which help you to focus the learning experiences to gain maximum output
  • mapping curriculum coverage, understanding if the learning deficit is because of an inability to understand or an act of omission in the curriculum previously taught
  • theagility of transference, how well is a pupil able to transfer prior learning by being a discerning and discriminating user of that which they know.

Rather than collecting statistical data throughout the year, teachers are given electronic progression sheets for reading, writing, maths and science. The sheets monitor curriculum coverage and gaps in learning, and have clear performance statements that teachers can use to inform them about whether a child is on track to meet expectations.

To find out more about this approach, you can read the full article on the Department for Education blog here

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