Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision: green paper

Between December 2017 and March 2018 the Department for Education and the Department of Health & Social Care held a public consultation on ‘Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision’.  The consultation received 2,700 responses and on 25th July 2018 the DfE published a green paper focusing on earlier intervention and prevention in schools.

 

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5 findings from the latest Special Educational Needs statistics

On the 26th July, the DfE published the latest statistics on pupils with special educational needs (SEN).

Summary

1. More pupils with SEN – For the second consecutive year, the proportion of pupils with SEN has risen from 14.4% of pupils (1,244,255) in January 2017 to 14.6% of pupils (1,276,215) in January 2018.

2. More pupils with a statement or Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan –  The number of pupils with a statement or EHC plan increased by 11,495 pupils between January 2017 and January 2018.  The percentage of pupils with a statement or EHC plan has risen to 2.9% after remaining constant for 10 years (2007-2017). Continue reading →

Reducing teacher workload

On 21st July 2018, the DfE released advice and tools to help school leaders and teachers review and reduce workload.

 

Background – The workload challenge

In October 2014 the DfE launched the workload challenge, where teachers were asked to share their views on how to reduce unnecessary workload.  Over 44,000 people responded to the survey, highlighting 3 main areas that can cause unnecessary workload – marking, planning and data management.

Read a full summary of the workload challenge here.

 

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KS2 National Test Results 2018

On 10th July 2018, the DfE published the results of the 2018 Key Stage 2 National Tests.

Summary of the 2018 results

  • 64% of pupils reached the expected standard in all of reading, writing and maths (combined).  This has increased from last year but remains below the floor standard of 65%.
  • The raw scores required to reach the expected standard have increased for all subjects.  The largest increase can be seen in maths, increasing from 57 in 2017 to 61 this year.
  • The average scaled score in reading has increased, while the scaled score in maths and GPS remains the same as last year.

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Multiplication tables check: update

On 9th July 2018, the DfE released an update on the development of the multiplication tables check (MTC).

About the MTC

  • Between 10th June – 28th June 2019 a national voluntary pilot will be run to allow schools to familiarise themselves with the check before  it becomes statutory in June 2020.
  • Schools will have a 3- week window to administer the tests, and teachers have the flexibility to check individual children, small groups or a whole class at the same time.

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Ofsted’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, talks about the curriculum and the relationship between Ofsted and data

Ofsted’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, delivered an insightful speech at the Wellington Festival of Education. So, we’ve picked out a handful of key points (particularly about the curriculum and the relationship between Ofsted and data) that we think you’ll find interesting ahead of next year…

 

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3 ways to reduce unnecessary workload with standardised tests

Katie_Blainey_standardised_reduce_workloadPublishing Director, Katie Blainey, explores unnecessary workload and how using standardised tests can save you heaps of valuable time!

It may sound unintuitive that an increase in testing can ultimately reduce workload for teachers and increase pupils’ learning, but it is worth considering. Increasingly, primary schools, secondary schools and MATs are adopting standardised tests across the school to support informed teaching and save time. Here are just 3 reasons why…

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How have our Optional Tests helped Primary children and teachers?

Optional_Tests_SATs_StyleAs the Summer term nears its end, our Assessment Publisher, Cerys Hadwin-Owen, takes the time to reflect on how using our Optional Tests this term has helped Primary children and teachers.

Our Optional Tests are written and edited by primary subject experts, many of whom have experience of working directly with the Department for Education on the current National Test papers. They have all been primary classroom teachers themselves, with many still holding teaching and leadership positions in schools across the country.

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Planned changes to accountability and why standardisation is more important than ever

James Pembroke is back with another blog, and this time he’s talking all about the planned changes to accountability and why this means that standardisation is more important than ever!

Standardisation_assessmentFor as long as most of us can remember, the progress of pupils in primary schools has been measured from Key Stage 1. Prior to 2016 we had a mixed economy of a levels of progress measure – where making two levels of progress across Key Stage 2 was defined as ‘expected’ – and a value added (VA) measure, in which each pupil’s score at key stage 2 was compared to the national average score of pupils with similar Key Stage 1 prior attainment. This dual approach to measuring progress was confusing because the two measures did not relate to one another. In fact, they were often at odds, and it was entirely feasible for a school to have all pupils make the expected progress of two levels and yet end up with a VA score that was significantly below average. Something had to give.

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