Formative assessment as an integrated part of good practice in the classroom

Thanks to Siobhan Skeffington  for the following article.

Siobhan Skeffington is an education consultant, author and reviewer also involved in test development and Primary Teacher for 26 years including SLT and Leading teacher.

Formative and summative assessments are very different.  Summative assessment gives a picture of how the child is progressing at any given point and enables teachers and schools to gauge the overall attainment; this can also be used for accountability purposes. Formative assessment needs to be part of everyday practice and lesson planning, as it focuses on improving learning.

Assessment is often seen as a tool to be planned for in the form of a spelling or mental maths test. Teachers and senior leaders can often feel pressurised to do constant mini summative tests believing these give a clear indication of how pupils are performing. These tests can be informative but the best formative assessment or ‘assessment for learning’ is through the conversations between the children and the teachers during the normal course of the day.  Through carefully planned questioning, open ended activities and marking that allows children to review their own work, formative assessment can give teachers a wealth of information to use when planning the next steps for learning.  If used appropriately, they will have identified any misconceptions or gaps in knowledge and will be better-able to determine what the children actually know.

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DfE announce new primary assessment plans

Plans have been announced by Justine Greening, the Education Secretary for the DfE, for a primary assessment system that focuses on pupil progress, mastering literacy and numeracy, and scrapping excessive workload for teachers.

The new primary assessment plans aim to deliver a better foundation for measuring progress and the impact of schools.

There are a number of important announcements in the full document, which you can read here. Please see below a summary of the main announcements:

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Acknowledgements for Reading copyright material

Acknowledgements

Every effort has been made to trace all copyright holders, but if any have been inadvertently overlooked, the Publishers will be pleased to make the necessary arrangements at the first opportunity.

Although every effort has been made to ensure that website addresses are correct at time of going to press, RS Assessment cannot be held responsible for the content of any website mentioned in this book. It is sometimes possible to find a relocated web page by typing in the address of the homepage for a website in the URL window of your browser.

The Publishers would like to thank the following for permission to reproduce copyright material.

 

Year 2

The Selfish Crocodile by Faustin Charles © Faustin Charles, 1998, The Selfish Crocodile and Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.

The Wrong Kind of Flower by Julia Donaldson. Extract from The Wrong Kind of Bark by Julia Donaldson. Text copyright © 2004 Julia Donaldson. Published by Egmont UK Limited and used with permission.

 

Florence Nightingale by Kay Barnham, first published in the UK by Wayland, an imprint of Hachette Children’s Books, Carmelite House, 50 Victoria Embankment, London, EC4Y 0DZ.

 

The Ugly Duckling. Reproduced from First Reading: The Ugly Duckling by permission of Usborne Publishing, 83-85 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8RT, UK. www.usborne.com. Copyright © 2006 Usborne Publishing Ltd.

Water, Water Everywhere by Jillian Harker © Jillian Harker. Reproduced by kind permission of the author.

 

Year 3

Only a Show by Anne Fine, published by Penguin Books. Reprinted by permission of David Higham Associates.

The Balloon Man by Eric Finney. © The Estate of Eric Finney. Reprinted by kind permission of the Estate of Eric Finney.

Zeus on the Loose by John Dougherty (Copyright © John Dougherty). Reprinted by permission of AM Heath Ltd.

Mairi’s Mermaid by Michael Morpurgo, published by Egmont UK Ltd. Reprinted by permission of David Higham Associates.

Mr Giant and the Beastly Baron by Tony Bradman, first published in the UK by Orchard Books, an imprint of Hachette Children’s Books, Carmelite House, 50 Victoria Embankment, London, EC4Y 0DZ.

Alex the Walking Accident by Ian Whybrow (Copyright © Ian Whybrow, 2006) is reproduced by permission of United Agents on behalf of Ian Whybrow.

The Shady Character by Colin McNaughton Copyright © 1993 Cohn McNaughton. The Shady Character from MAKING FRIENDS WITH FRANKENSTEIN by Cohn McNaughton. Reproduced by permission of Walker Books Ltd, London SE1 1 SHJ.

www.walker.co.uk

 

How? by Richard Edwards from Night-night, Knight and Other Poems. Permission sought from rightsholder.

The Answers by Robert Clairmont from Night-night, Knight and Other Poems. Permission sought from rightsholder.

Dick Wittington from The Emperor’s New Clothes and Other Stories retold by Mary Hoffman. Permission sought from rightsholder.

Year 4

Tilly Mint and the Leaf-lords from Tilly Mint Tales by Berlie Doherty, published by Young Corgi Books. Reprinted by permission of David Higham Associates.

Don’t Tread on Worms! by Eric Finney. © The Estate of Eric Finney. Reprinted by kind permission of the Estate of Eric Finney.

Viking Vik and the Longship from Shoo Rayner, first published in the UK by Orchard Books, an imprint of Hachette Children’s Books, Carmelite House, 50 Victoria Embankment, London, EC4Y 0DZ.

Anancy by Lilian Allen from Under the Moon and Over the Sea, published by Walker Books. Reprinted by kind permission of the author.

Discovered: Stonehenge Village by James Owen. Reproduced by permission of National Geographic Creative.

Damian Drooth Supersleuth: Dog Snatchers by Barbara Mitchelhill. Reprinted by permission of Andersen Press Ltd.

Sprint by Roger Stevens from Olympic Poems by Brian Moses and Roger Stevens, published by Macmillan. Reprinted by kind permission of the author.

A Bag Full of Stories by Anna Milbourne, Heather Amery and Gillian Doherty. Reproduced from The Usborne Book of Myths and Legends by permission of Usborne Publishing, 83-85 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8RT, UK. www.usborne.com. Copyright © 2006 Usborne Publishing Ltd.

Brave Hendrick by Anna Milbourne, Heather Amery and Gillian Doherty. Reproduced from The Usborne Book of Myths and Legends by permission of Usborne Publishing, 83-85 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8RT, UK. www.usborne.com. Copyright © 2006 Usborne Publishing Ltd.

Belling the Cat from The First Macmillan Nursery Collection by Mary Hoffman. Permission sought from rightsholder.

Year 5

Oliver Twist retold by Mary Sebag-Montefiore. Reproduced from Oliver Twist by permission of Usborne Publishing, 83-85 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8RT, UK. www.usborne.com. Copyright © 2007 Usborne Publishing Ltd.

 

Colly’s Barn by Michael Morpurgo. Text copyright © 1991 Michael Morpurgo. Published by Egmont UK Ltd and used with permission.

 

‘Why Do You Stay Up So Late?’ From Rain by Don Paterson. Published by Faber, 2009. Copyright © Don Paterson. Reproduced by permission of the author c/o Rogers, Coleridge & White Ltd., 20 Powis Mews, London W11 1JN.

The Cats’ Protection League by Roger McGough, from Bad, Bad Cats (© Roger McGough 1997) is printed by permission of Peters Fraser & Dunlop Ltd on behalf of Roger McGough.

 

TOM’S MIDNIGHT GARDEN by Philippa Pearce (OUP,1958) 1 extract. By permission of Oxford University Press, UK.

Ten Freaky Forces of Nature by Douglas E. Richards. Reproduced by permission of National Geographic Creative.

Room 13 by Robert Swindells. Permission sought from rightsholder. We invite world rights holders to contact us.

 

Year 6

The Titanic by Gillian Clarke © Gillian Clarke. Reprinted by kind permission of the author.

Act 1 Lachland’s Workshop by Philip Pullman from The Firework-Maker’s Daughter © Philip Pullman, adapted for stage by Stephen Russell 2010. By kind permission of Oberon Books Ltd.

Prehistoric Britain by Ruth Brocklehurst. Reproduced from The Usborne History of Britain by permission of Usborne Publishing, 83-85 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8RT, UK. www.usborne.com. Copyright © 2008 Usborne Publishing Ltd.

 

Act 1 Druid’s Grove from Carrie’s War by © Emma Jane Reeves and Nina Bawden 2006. By kind permission of Oberon Books Ltd.

The Ground Gives Way from Stig of the Dump by Clive King, published by Puffin Classics 2010. Reprinted by permission of David Higham Associates.

Geography Lesson from Juggling with Gerbils by Brian Patten. Published by Puffin, 2000. © Brian Patten. Reproduced by permission of the author c/o Rogers, Coleridge & White Ltd., 20 Powis Mews, London W11 1JN.

Peggy Sue from Kensuke’s Kingdom by Michael Morpurgo, published by Heinemann Young Books Ltd 1999. Reprinted by permission of David Higham Associates.

The Sword in the Stone by Felicity Brooks. Reproduced from The Tales of King Arthur by permission of Usborne Publishing, 83-85 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8RT, UK. www.usborne.com. Copyright © 2006 Usborne Publishing Ltd.

Talking Turkeys by Benjamin Zephaniah. Permission sought from rightsholder.

Being Human from Why Is Snot Green? And Other Extremely Important Questions (And Answers) from the Science Museum by Glen Murphy. Permission sought from rightsholder.

The launch of RS Assessment from Hodder Education

By Katie Blainey, Publishing Director

I’m delighted to be sharing news of an exciting collaboration!

Over the years, Rising Stars has become the assessment provider of choice for over 11,500 primary schools, whilst Hodder Education has been providing rigorous tests to schools for over 40 years. This term we are pleased to bring together two of the most trusted names in education to launch RS Assessment from Hodder Education, to make it even easier for you to access the support and resources you need.

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What are the challenges in assessing pupils working below the expected standard?

Thanks to Lorraine Petersen, Independent Educational Consultant – Former Chief Executive of Nasen, for the following article.

 

Setting the scene

Statutory assessment plays an important role in ensuring that every child is supported to leave primary school prepared to succeed. It is crucial that every school is able to demonstrate every pupil’s personal attainment and progress not just at the end of a key stage but throughout their primary education.

Those pupils who have not completed the relevant programmes of study when they reach the appropriate age for statutory assessments do not have the knowledge and skills to achieve expected standard in the national curriculum tests. This is a diverse group including those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), those from disadvantaged backgrounds and those with English as an additional language. Schools have to look for other ways to monitor and celebrate success and progress for this group of pupils.

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KS2 National Curriculum Assessment Results

On 31st August the DfE released the results of the KS2 national curriculum assessments and information about the 2017 performance tables.

 

2017 KS2 SATs results

This year there has been an increase in the proportion of pupils achieving both the expected standard and the higher standard in reading, writing and mathematics, compared with 2016.

The proportion of pupil’s achieving the expected standard has increased by 8 percentage points, from 53% in 2016 to 61% in 2017, and those attaining the higher standard has also increased from 5% to 9%. Continue reading →

How preparing for the SATs is like training for a marathon

Thanks to Cerys Hadwin-Owen, Assessment Publisher for RS Assessment for Hodder Education, for the following article.

On the face of it, training for a marathon and preparing for SATs might seem like completely different experiences. However many assessment experts have recognised the similarities between sport and assessment in the past (including Daisy Christodoulou in her latest book). Here at RS Assessment from Hodder Education, we find it really helpful when explaining to schools and teachers how our wide range of assessment resources work together, and amidst the very valid concerns around over-testing that face both primary and secondary schools in the current climate, we feel it’s an analogy worth sharing.

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Changes to GCSEs

From August 2017 GCSE students in England will be examined using more challenging papers, designed to match the exams of their peers in high-performing education systems around the world.

Changes to the qualifications are designed to ensure that young people will leave school with the skills they need to succeed in the workplace or further study.  The new GCSEs will be awarded using a new number grading scale, rather than the traditional letter scale, running from 9 to 1 (with 9 as the highest grade) rather than from A* to G. Continue reading →

A level results day 2017

Pupils across England, Wales and Northern Ireland received their A level results today and overall, pass levels have fallen slightly but top A and A* grades are up. A-level entry numbers remained stable, whilst the number of AS-level entries dropped significantly. Find out more about trends in entry level numbers here.

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