Phonics Screening Check: Sample materials and training videos

On 23rd April, the DfE updated the sample materials available for the 2018 Phonics Screening Check.

Structure of the Phonics Screening Check
The check contains 40 words divided into two sections of 20 words.  Both sections contains a mix of pseudo-words and real words.
Read more about the structure here.

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Reception baseline assessment

In response to the 2017 ‘Primary assessment in England government consultation’, on 11th April 2018 the DfE announced the introduction of a new statutory reception baseline assessment in autumn 2020.

 

New baseline assessments to be introduced from autumn 2020

The test will be administered by schools as soon as children enter reception and will enable schools to measure children’s progress from reception through to KS2.  The DfE will publish the results of these measures for all through primaries in the summer of 2027.

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6 ways to improve GPS test technique

How about a few more marks on grammar papers?

Thanks to Ruth Duckworth for the following article.

As we are in the last few teaching weeks running up to the end of Key Stage Two SATs again, Year Six teachers like myself are now well-entrenched in test practice – encouraging pupils to keep their full focus to achieve their best and grasp the all-important ‘expected’ score (from last year of course) before May.  Then, we may all be a little more confident that whatever the real tests bring, the 100s will flow.  Continue reading →

7 things you need to know about standardised scores and scaled scores

Scaled scores and standardised scores – what’s the difference?

By Cerys Hadwin-Owen, Assessment Publisher

WCerys Hadwin-Owenith so many different assessment measures being used throughout primary schools, we’re often asked to clarify the difference between them. So we’ve gone back to the drawing board to provide some quick facts about two key test outcomes: scaled scores and standardised scores (because while both show performance, they aren’t quite the same thing).

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