KS2 National Curriculum Assessments 2019 (interim)

On 9th July 2019, the DfE released the interim results for the KS2 National Tests.

 

Attainment in individual subjects

  • In reading, 73% of pupils reached the expected standard, down by 2 percentage points from 2018.
  • In maths, 79% of pupils reached the expected standard, up by 3 percentage points from 2018.
  • In GPS, 78% of pupils reached the expected standard, which remains unchanged from 2018.

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KS2 National Test Results 2018

On 10th July 2018, the DfE published the results of the 2018 Key Stage 2 National Tests.

Summary of the 2018 results

  • 64% of pupils reached the expected standard in all of reading, writing and maths (combined).  This has increased from last year but remains below the floor standard of 65%.
  • The raw scores required to reach the expected standard have increased for all subjects.  The largest increase can be seen in maths, increasing from 57 in 2017 to 61 this year.
  • The average scaled score in reading has increased, while the scaled score in maths and GPS remains the same as last year.

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How have our Optional Tests helped Primary children and teachers?

Optional_Tests_SATs_StyleAs the Summer term nears its end, our Assessment Publisher, Cerys Hadwin-Owen, takes the time to reflect on how using our Optional Tests this term has helped Primary children and teachers.

Our Optional Tests are written and edited by primary subject experts, many of whom have experience of working directly with the Department for Education on the current National Test papers. They have all been primary classroom teachers themselves, with many still holding teaching and leadership positions in schools across the country.

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The Year 6 SATs are over, so what next for Year 5?

Thanks to Ruth Duckworth, Year 6 Teacher/Writing Lead at Christ Church C of E Primary School, for this really insightful piece full of handy hints and tips for transitioning your Year 5s into Year 6.

The Year 6 SATs are over for another year; writing pieces will soon complete the end of Key Stage 2 assessments and many staff will breathe more easily for a few weeks – until ‘data day’ in early July. So, many of you will be thinking about the next cohort to come into Year 6. Continue reading →

What are the challenges in assessing pupils working below the expected standard?

Thanks to Lorraine Petersen, Independent Educational Consultant – Former Chief Executive of Nasen, for the following article.

 

Setting the scene

Statutory assessment plays an important role in ensuring that every child is supported to leave primary school prepared to succeed. It is crucial that every school is able to demonstrate every pupil’s personal attainment and progress not just at the end of a key stage but throughout their primary education.

Those pupils who have not completed the relevant programmes of study when they reach the appropriate age for statutory assessments do not have the knowledge and skills to achieve expected standard in the national curriculum tests. This is a diverse group including those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), those from disadvantaged backgrounds and those with English as an additional language. Schools have to look for other ways to monitor and celebrate success and progress for this group of pupils.

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How preparing for the SATs is like training for a marathon

Thanks to Cerys Hadwin-Owen, Assessment Publisher for RS Assessment for Hodder Education, for the following article.

On the face of it, training for a marathon and preparing for SATs might seem like completely different experiences. However many assessment experts have recognised the similarities between sport and assessment in the past (including Daisy Christodoulou in her latest book). Here at RS Assessment from Hodder Education, we find it really helpful when explaining to schools and teachers how our wide range of assessment resources work together, and amidst the very valid concerns around over-testing that face both primary and secondary schools in the current climate, we feel it’s an analogy worth sharing.

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